ARIZONA REPORTER’S HANDBOOK ON MEDIA LAW

The 7th edition of the Arizona Reporter’s Handbook on Media Law (2015) is available free as an e-book. Its principal author and editor is Daniel C. Barr, esq., of the Phoenix law firm of Perkins Coie, L.L.P., and counsel to the First Amendment Coalition of Arizona Inc. The 7th edition, the latest since 2007, notes the 34 years that Perkins CoieARHML 7th ed cover has represented the coalition, to whose member organizations the Handbook is presented, Barr wrote in its foreword.

Download it for free onto your tablet, smartphone or computer.

From the Handbook’s foreword:

“This Handbook addresses:

  1. Access to the news, including media access to court proceedings, public records, governmental
    meetings and facilities, and private property;
  2. Interference with the news gathering process, such as subpoenas, search warrants and gag orders;
  3. Limitations on the content of communications, including prior restraints and the laws of defamation and privacy;
  4. Promises of confidentiality to sources; and
  5.  Copyright and trademark law.”

If your computer has trouble downloading the Handbook, please paste the following link into your browser:

http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/521007

 

PUBLIC RECORDS AND PRIVACY ACT REQUESTS

Arizona

Click on this page on the National Freedom of Information Coalition website for a sample letter you can use as the basis for a request for public records held by state, county, municipal or other local governments in Arizona.

Click on this page to read Arizona Supreme Court Rule 123, governing access to judicial records of Arizona state courts.

nfoic_logoFederal

Click on this page on the National Freedom of Information Coalition website for several sample letters you can use as the basis for a request under the federal Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) for public records held by the U.S. government, or for various requests under the Federal Privacy Act.

 

RULES GOVERNING USE OF CAMERAS AND OTHER ELECTRONIC DEVICES IN COURTROOMS

Arizona

Click on this page to read Arizona Supreme Court Rule 122, “Use of Recording Devices in a Courtroom.” This includes cameras and other video and audio recording devices not on the person.

Click on this page to read Arizona Supreme Court Rule 122.1, “Use of Portable Electronic Devices in a Courthouse.” This includes personal audio recorders, smartphones, laptops and tablets.

Federal

Federal court rules prohibit the use of any audio or video recording devices by members of the media or the public in federal courtrooms. On rare occasion, usually in cases of high profile, federal courts have recorded audio themselves and allowed recordings to be made available to the media and public.